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Tyler Friedrich is in his seventh year at Stanford and his fifth serving as the Marie and Alex Shipman Director of Sports Performance and Applied Sports Science. In his role, Friedrich has oversight over all of the strength and conditioning and sports science efforts for all of the Olympic Sports. He is also responsible for designing and implementing the sports performance programs for women's volleyball, beach volleyball, women’s rowing and men’s gymnastics.

Before coming to Stanford, Friedrich spent three and a half years at Arizona State University. With the Sun Devils, Friedrich assisted with the football strength and conditioning program and spent time with women's volleyball, beach volleyball, men’s and women’s swimming and diving, triathlon, hockey and wrestling. He also directed all aspects of the Catapult athlete GPS system for the football team where he analyzed all data from practices and games. Along with managing the Catapult system, Friedrich was responsible for the sport technology integration for the sports performance department, and was a member of the Technology and Research Committee for Sun Devil Athletics.

Prior to his stint at Arizona State, Friedrich worked as an Assistant Strength and Conditioning coach at the University of Dayton, where he assisted with football, women's volleyball, track and field, women’s basketball, men’s and women’s soccer and women’s cross country. He was also directly responsible for implementing the strength and conditioning programs for men’s and women’s golf, men’s and women’s tennis and the women’s rowing program.

Friedrich earned both his undergraduate degree in exercise physiology (2010) and graduate degree in exercise science (2012) from the University of Dayton. In 2011 he worked as a Graduate Assistant for the Health and Sport Science Department at Dayton, where he taught exercise physiology lab courses and worked as a graduate student assistant strength coach. Friedrich holds certifications with USA weightlifting and the National Strength and Conditioning Association.